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Figuratively Speaking: Acrylic Works by DaNeal Eberly

DaNeal Eberly was born and raised in Lubbock, Texas. She graduated with a Fine Arts Degree from Texas Tech University in 1997. She has lived and created art all over the United States. Currently, she lives and paints in Montgomery, Alabama. Her work is part of the permanent collection of Jackson Hospital. Also, she has had work displayed at the University of Maryland, The Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and is represented by The Loft gallery in Marietta, Georgia, The Attic Gallery in Vicksburg, Mississippi and Gallery 905 in Selma. She has had a solo show at The Armory in Downtown Montgomery and been juried into a show at the University of Alabama in Huntsville in conjunction with the Alabama Women’s Caucus of Artists.  She paints at the King’s Canvas, an art space on the West Side of Montgomery and participates in community art projects as often as possible.

Artist Statement
“Painting is a very physical, almost musical, experience for me. Even if I spend days and weeks on a piece, I hope to always exemplify the fervor of artistic invention and to glorify playful experimentation. Truthfully, the physical application of paint and the physical act of digging into wet paint with a palette knife or even a paintbrush handle excites me. I enjoy portraying powerful women in the common moments of everyday life. I use rich, bold, expressive colors because I believe color incites longing and depicts angst, and provokes revelry. I use female models who are also friends of mine. Together with them, through dialogue and discussions on posture and posing, I seek to reveal and unfold the natural beauty and unlock feminine boldness through confident vulnerability. As I age and live in daily work, daily responsibility world as a woman, I am struck and compelled by how much a relaxing moment or a chance to unwind at the end of a long stressful day resonates with me, and resonates with people living ordinary lives. Through many conversations and honest relationships, I keep feeling how important the small things are to most women. Being powerful does not necessarily equate to being over others, but power from love comes in being with people and wanting to understand them. I seek to make my art honest to my life and consistent with what moves my own heart and hopefully in the process touches a few others’ hearts and helps them feel seen and significant life-changing experiences, it also confirmed that culture and identity have an underlying presence, no matter where you go.”

—DaNeal Eberly